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Woodland

Woodlands can help to attenuate floods through a number of hydrological processes, such as the interception of rainfall, increased use of water (evapotranspiration), and increased infiltration of water into the soil profile.  Woodlands also act to slow surface runoff and reduce sediment transport down hillslopes, by increasing the resistance to flow. Upland areas, which have higher rainfall, steeper slopes, gullies and often quite shallow soils, can deliver significant amounts of floodwater from headwaters to the lower catchment areas. Well sited and managed woodlands protect the soil from disturbance and improve soil structure due to the action of tree roots and high inputs of organic matter. These conditions enhance the soil infiltration pathways and the water storage capacity thereby reducing direct surface run-off, erosion and sediment transport.

Case Studies

News & Events

A new open access book entitled “Spatial Flood Risk Management: Implementing Catchment-based Retention and Resilience on Private Land” has been published. Centralising the role of land and...
The Riverwoods initiative (see main website for more info) aims to create a network of thriving riverbank woodlands and healthy river systems across Scotland. It has recently published an...
A manual supporting the implementation of Natural Flood Management measures has been published by CIRIA. It aims to set out the key stages in the delivery process of NFM. The manual has five...

Literature

What can be learnt from working with a community to identify what flood risk management measures are needed, are acceptable and which deliver the greatest multiple benefits?

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